Barth Rene Cremant d'Alsace

A lovely sparkler from d'Alsace: crisp and vibrant with notes of apple and lemon zest.
SKU: 2189
$23.25

Details

Details

Winemaker Michel Fonne studied winemaking in Damery, and it is from this heart of Champagne that he learned the "methode champenoise" which has allowed him to craft Barth Renes world renowned Cremant D'Alsace. Ten percent of the estate's 30 acres are dedicated to the production of this wine, comprised of a blend of Pinot Noir and Pinot Blanc grapes which are all harvested manually. The result is a sparkler with elegant hints of yeast, lemon and a fine minerality that leaves a fresh impression on the palate.

Additional Info

Additional Info

Farming Standard sustainable
Winemaker Michel Fonne
Producer Barth Rene
Alcohol 0.00
ml 750
Residual Sugar (g/L) 12.00
Acidity (g/l) 0.00
Closure Cork
Cellar Potential No
Grape Variety 70% - Pinot Blanc
30% - Pinot Noir
Body light
Sweetness off-dry
region Alsace

Region

Alsace


The magical land between the Vosges and the Rhine is best known as a region offering many gustatory delights, both upon the plate and in the glass. The region was home to a very early version of "weight-watchers" when the Societe des Maigres (the League of Lean Men) was founded in the seventeenth century.

Alsace offers a diversion from one primary characteristic of French winegrowing districts, in that the wines are labelled with the name of the grape variety, rather than that of village or region. And it's worth noting that while the names of these varieties are often Germanic, like Riesling and Gewurztraminer (without the umlaut in French), the style of the wines has more similarity to that of Burgundy than it does with the bottlings from the other side of the Rhine.

German ownership of Alsace between 1871 and 1918 did little to change this. Other notable wines are made from Pinot Gris, Muscat, Pinot Auxerrois and Sylvaner, though the latter two are still excluded from Grand Cru status in most cases.

Subregion

Haut-Rhin


The name meaning "Upper Rhine", this is the smaller of the two departments that make up Alsace. However, the district is home to most of the finest wines produced in the province. It runs from just between Ribeauville and Selestat in the north, all the way down to the Swiss border at Basel in the south.

Barth Rene