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Wine Know-how

Greet the Grape – St. Laurent


Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

Sankt Laurent
Meet Saint Laurent, one in the Triad of Important Austrian Red Wine Grapes. “You have to be a little crazy to grow this varietal ” winemaker Birgit Braunstein once confessed to me, “but I believe the rewards merit the pain of it all.”

The Wine and Cheese Pairing Guide – Grape by Grape, Cheese by Cheese


Thursday, May 17th, 2012

Grape by grape, cheese by cheese-- this is your guide for how to pair them up. Check back often and much as new pairings are added...

Phylloxera 101


Monday, May 14th, 2012

Drunken Phylloxera
Phylloxera Vastatrix sounds like the stage name of a frowsy screen-starlet appearing in low-budget S&M movies. And oh, what we folks in the world of fine wine wouldn’t give if only that were the case, and this critter—also known as Daktulosphaira vitifoliae—were really a cinema-performer of indifferent talent....

Greet the Grape: Neuburger


Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

Neuburger—in fact, the “new citizen,” is one of these extraordinary products of ampelographic promiscuity—Roter Veltliner mating with Señora Sylvaner

Greet the Grape: Zierfandler


Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

A precious and endangered species peculiar to the Thermenregion—with a few rows of vines planted within the city limits of Vienna—Zierfandler resulted from a spontaneous crossing of Roter Veltliner and an unidentified Traminer-like vine.

Greet the Grape: Zweigelt


Tuesday, February 8th, 2011

While occasionally profound, Zweigelt is so frequently delicious, and handles such a wide range of culinary demands, that one is amazed at its versatility. Try it with highfalutin’ Mexican cuisine, molé or adobo—take it to tandoori, pair it with panang—Zweigelt paints the very picture of panache…

Don~Q takes a tilt at terroir —


Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

Terroir has come into vogue in recent years as a quality which every wine who’s anywine at all must vividly demonstrate, to the point of being almost clichéed, to the point where I will use the word only once in a meeting. And beyond that? I just took the question to my big old Petit Larousse, where the following enlightenment awaited:

Ice Wine (aka: Eiswein, Icewein, Icewine, Eiswine)


Wednesday, October 19th, 2005

Frozen VineFrozen Vines
Ice wine has German roots, which is why you will commonly see the German spellings for ice, "Eis” and Wine, "Wein" combined as Eiswein. You will also come across a host of incorrect mixes of the two languages creating spellings such as Eiswine and icewein. You may also find it called Vin de Glacier and Ledove Vino. But all of them refer to one thing: Wine, made from grapes which have frozen on the vine.

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